Saturday, June 15, 2013

John & Lynne's French odyssey. Day 3, A visit to Cognac producer Grosperrin in Saintes

Guilhem Grosperrin took over his father’s business ten years ago when his father fell ill with MS. He was 23
Ancient beams in the old warehouse building he has bought and renovated
Bottles of Cognac ready to be packed and shipped
Barrels of aged Cognac and Pineau de Charentes
New and old demijohns in the cellar
Prototype bottles and labels
and samples of bottles and decanters
A variety of different cognacs in the lab – we tasted several of them. Sadly, the driver, as usual, spat most of it out
A new label, aimed at the young market and designed by Guilhem’s sister
with a vintage single vineyard Cognac
The oldest we tasted, distilled in 1810 – at that time other flavours were often blended in to suit the buyer’s taste and this had a trace of rum
Ancient bottles of Cognac and Pineau
and a sherry
1989 from the Petite Champagne region.
Grande Champagne and Petite Champagne are regions of Cognac and have no relation to the “other” Champagne, far to the north, famous for lovely fizz
A deluxe label of Petite Champagne Cognac
The 1820 was rich and amazingly fresh
A 1991 from l'Ile d’Oléron
An XO blended from Grande and Petite Champagne Cognacs
Guilhem’s retail shop
where he sells natural and organic wines. He gave us a 2009 Côtes de Rhône from Faugères, which was soft and fruity with a mineral backbone.
A window display of Grosperrin Cognacs
And shelves of Pineaus
Guilhem using a pupitre to give us a taste of aged Pineau from the barrel
2004 Grande Champagne Cognac in the barrel, made from Colombard, 
Every barrel produced has to be decanted and sealed by the bailiff before it can be bottled
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© John & Lynne Ford, Adamastor & Bacchus 2013
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